Ikebana Arts

by Kika Shibata


Sogetsu School

We believe in an Ikebana of no limits, in which anything may be used as material and displayed anywhere and in any circumstances. There are so many countries on this earth, with different races, different climates and customs. Flowers and tree change, too, as we move from north to south, from temperate to tropical regions, but this is not a barrier for Sogetsu Ikebana, for we arrange local material in containers used in each particular area. Sogetsu Ikebana derives from Japanese tradition, but is now blooming all over the world.

The Sogetsu School was established by late Iemoto Sofu Teshigahara (1900-1979) in 1927. Believing that Ikebana should be both enjoyable and creative, Sofu developed a school of Ikebana deeply rootedin Japanese tradition yet meeting the requirements of the age. The Kakeiho method he developed was a systematic approach through several styles which made Ikebana available to everyone. By this means, Sofu spread the art throughout the world as well as staging exhibitions of his own Ikebana-based sculputure.

Kasumi (1933-1980), daughter of and successor to Sofu, stared career as an Ikebana artist after the Second World War. Her elegant and feminine works especially charmed many overseas enthusiasts of Ikebana.

Horoshi Teshigahara has been Iemoto since 1980. His keen sensitivity and outstanding ability have found expression a very contemporary use of space.